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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN 17
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 10:00am EST
normal trade relations to russia. this past august russia joined the world trade organization, giving its members full access to russia's rapidly growing market. reduce tariffs, and ensure transparency when implementing trade measures. however, while foreign competitors are currently benefiting, the u.s. will not receive any of these benefits until congress authorizes the president to grant russia permanent normal trade relations. simply put, american companies, workers, and farmers are being put at a competitive disadvantage. last year my home state of michigan exported $225 million worth of goods to russia. despite many of its best products facing tough competition from foreign competitors. with this agreement in place, farmers and producers in my district will be assured of more predictable market access for the crops and arkansas urel goods, while manufacturers will enjoy reduced tariff rates for michigan-made vehicles and equipment. as the world trade organization member, russia has agreed to comply with the rule of law. though these reforms won't happen overnight, russia's acces
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2012 5:00pm EST
scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illegal scheme. the bill also directs appropriate u.s. government officials to negotiate a worldwide approach to address aircraft emissions and to take appropriate actions to hold u.s. civil operators harmless from the e.u. emissions trading scheme. the e.u. needs to slow down, carefully weigh its decision to include international civil aviation in its emissions trading scheme. a better approach would be to work with the international civil aviation community through the u.n. international civil aviation organization to establish consensus-driven initiatives to reduce airline emissions. i'm pleased to see movement on the part of the e.u. to work with international community at i.k.o. to seek a global approach to civil aviation emissions. while the post ponement for a year is a positive sign, it's not enough to ensure u.s. operators won't be negatively impacted by the trading scheme at some p
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2012 9:00am EST
, serge jay brinn, born in russia, co-founder of google in my county, that employs thousands and thousands of americans. he didn't come here because of his degree. he came with his parents. jerry yang, founder of yahoo, grew up in east san jose he didn't come because he got admitted to stanford he came with his family. andy grove, a legend at intel, didn't come because of his degree, he came as a refugee. i'm reminded of my grandfather and what he brought that country. at age 16, he got on a boat, he never saw his parents again. he never got a degree. i he came to america because he wanted to be free. he worked hard all his life. i was the first one, i went to stanford university, i was the first in my family to go to college. but i was -- i'm here today in congress because my grandfather, without an education, but with a lot of heart, with enough get up and go to get up and go came to become an american. i am sure that if you examined the history of so many members of congress you would find in their family tree people who had enough get up and go to come to the united states. we are now
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 1:00pm EST
relations to russia. . this important legislation is a small step towards a big reward. without it the united states exporters and service providers will continue to lose business to our foreign competitors that have already have trade relations -- relationships with russia. and once we lose those markets, our competitors will only become stronger and better positioned to surpass the u.s. in a critical marketplace of the 21st century global economy. according to the national association of manufacturers, russia imported over $500 billion in goods last year, and of that total only 5% came from u.s. exports. this bill will lift outdated policies and restrict american access to russian markets. as a result studies show u.s. producers can expect to achieve double-digit increases over the next decade in exports of heavy machinery, agricultural machinery, chemicals, and services. this is particularly critical for my home state of illinois where we have fallen behind japan and korea in these export categories. most importantly, granting russia permanent normal trade relations gives the u.s. a
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 10:00am EST
league envoy who i met a few days ago in cairo and renew our efforts to persuade russia d china to work with us at the u.n. security council. i will take every opportunity to urge my russian and chinese colleagues to support the political and diplomatic solution to the conflict in syria. without such a solution everything that they and we most fear is coming closer, including ever-greater loss of life, instability in neighboring countries and an opportunity for extremists to pursue their own ends. the basis for such a political settlement is clear: a credible alternative to the assad regime is emerging that has the growing support of the arab league, the european union, the united states and an in's cooing number -- increasing number of countries, and we have an agreed basis for transition which all permanent members of the u.n. security council signed up to in june. but in the absence of that political and diplomat you can solution, we will not rule out any option, and in accordance with international law where it might save innocent lives in syria and prevent the destabilization
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2012 9:00am EST
vote for this bill, h.r. 6156, even though i remain strongly opposed to granting russia permanent normal trade relations or pntr, at this time. i would like to explain the reasons why. those who argued for granting russia pntr, which has until now been prevented by what is known as the jackson-vanik amendment, focus on the supposedly bilateral trade benefits. the issue that concerns me and many members is not trade but human rights. advocates of repeal say that the jackson-vanik amendment is outdated and is purely symbolic and therefore should be disregarded. but in the ira of human rights, madam speaker, symbols can have a very great importance. over the years jackson-vanik has become a sign of the continuing u.s. commitment to human rights in russia and elsewhere. repealing the amendment could very well be interpreted as an indication that our commitment is now weakening. this would be a terrible signal to send at a time when putin is in the process of imposing ever tighter restrictions on all opposition to his regime, especially democratic activists and any others who dare to d
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2012 1:00pm EST
, president putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that i'll take your questions. >> a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering, one specific and a bigger picture one. general allen we are learning more about skess about him and the pentagon investigation and alleged behavior does the president have faith that general allen can continue to lead the war in afghanistan. he's under investigation by the pentagon. >> can i tell you that the president thinks very highly of general allen and his service to his country. as well as the job he has done in afghanistan. at the request of the secretary of defense, the president has put on hold general allen's notion as supreme allied commander europe, pending the investigation of his conduct by the department of defense i.d. the president remains focused on fully supporting our extraordinary troops and coalition partners in afghanistan who general allen continues to lead as he has done so ably for over a year. meanwhile, the president has nominated general dunford to be the next commander and reiterates his belie
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 1:00pm EDT
geographic documentary and i am quoting a lot of it, where they were born and raised in russia and they inherited a lot of money and they are actually communists. so all the republican party kind of liens on their side. money is not given away -- some people just give money away or they loan it to you, but if you are going to give money for a republican to win, to buy a governor or a president, there is something you want back. all of these republicans better take in mind that they could be voting for a communist which is a movement coming into our country. the documentary says -- host: where did you see the documentary? caller: national geographic. from noon until 6:00, and half of it was about the koch brothers. but you saw it on the national geographic jenna? larry sabato, any response? guest: i am just on to say this. i never met the koch brothers and i never -- never corresponded with them. i've got news for you. they are not communists. i am pretty sure of that. so, let me just correct the record, and i think we should go on. host: how often do voters split tickets in virginia? gu
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 12:00pm EST
of goods to brazil are up 25%, up 40%, russia up 80%. last week we took steps towards a new defense partnership with united arab emirate that could be worth more than 6 billion pounds to british industry. i want us to go further still. when i look around the world, i see countries like germany using overseas business that works to drive new business. in brazil, for example, 1700 members of the german chamber. 1700 members of the u.s. chamber's. how many does the u.k. have? just 240. we need to do all whole lot better than that. i have asked steven green, our trade minister to work at home and overseas to increase the quantity and quality of services offered, could relate to the smaller companies seeking to establish themselves abroad for the first time. he will begin within 8 million pound pilot and 20 keep markets and go on to lead a transformation that will change the face of british trade overseas across the globe. there are valuable markets out there that just have not received the attention from government that they deserve. places like to wait, vietnam, algeria, indonesia, roc
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 5:00pm EST
militarily? russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say about because we went to bosnia and not because they were a threat to
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 12:00pm EST
. [indiscernible] [laughter] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles whe
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 5:00pm EST
take the first question first. the question was about to russia's role in asia pacific. russia was this year's host of apac. it will participate at the east asia summit. it is an important player in the asia-pacific region. both economically and diplomatically. it will continue to be so. >> regarding the president's trip to burma. human-rights leaders expressed concerns that this visit was too fast, too generous. their main concern here is that the administration is far leveraging the opportunity of the first presidential visit which can only be once to press for new reforms. has the administration been able to leverage this a budget -- visit for tangible foreign measures? would you like to be secretary of state? thank you. [laughter] >> thank you for those questions, josh. with respect to burma -- there have been remarkable progress. since we saw the president called them cookers of progress in the summer of 2011. you have seen the release of prisoners, you have seen the easing of the media restrictions, you have seen the infighting into the political process of the parties. we ha
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 1:00pm EST
united states comes in and says, look, we have the leaders of france and britain and china and russia and the u.n. and we're trying to prevent nuclear weapons, you know, you should probably not meddle in this. that's a winnable argument. i think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 12:35am EST
consequences for russia, this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower, with the u.n. i am sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush acted to go to war without a un resolution, they were very uneasy, but now, we find people saying, "maybe obama should do it," for different reasons. it is not tied to the election. the election is not going to solve the problem for them. >> let me also say i agree, 100%. do not get me wrong. i do not think that us going in and invading is going to change perceptions. either way, there is going to be these perceptions. helping syria is by no means going to change the perception that we helped some countries because of resources versus others -- that we help some countries because of resources versus others. >> i see no such trend in the country. i just do not see any public support for it. i think shibley has got it right. intervention would make things worse for syria and for us. you ask what is going to look like in a year, and i push it out five years. i think we are looking at a civil war. eve
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 10:00am EST
not think russia is wedded to assad. may be establishing a no-fly zone from turkey, may be providing direct military assistance, but something to break the region's debt lot. syria cannot afford for a long time much of the destruction that it is undertaking. my last point has to do with peace. rob cover this up. i have said this for awhile and i will say it again, very and diplomatically, it is peace now or never. i understand all the difficulties that the u.s. president will face in trying to bring this to conflict resolution. i understand the priority of this issue is not in terms of other u.s. priorities domestically. i understand the president is facing hard-line israeli government not interested in my view in 8 two-state solution that is viable, a week palestinian government that does not have what it takes to come to an arrangement. i understand all this. i also understand if something drastic is not done today, we will lose this opportunity probably forever. one has to choose between the difficult and the impossible, and i choose -- i want to choose on this issue. i will stop
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 10:00am EST
, russia, known as the p-5 plus one and the united kingdom have tried to negotiate with iran over its nuclear program. both sides have fumbled the fleeting opportunities to reduce the risk of a nuclear armed iran, and to prevent the risk of war, to reduce the risk of war over that nuclear program. since 2007, u.s. and western intelligence agencies have assessed that iran is nuclear capable. meaning that iran has a scientific, technical, and industrial capacity eventually to produce nuclear weapons if it decides to do so. and those intelligence agencies continue to this day to assess that iran has not yet made a decision to do so. the intelligence agencies and independent experts also believe that starting from today iran would require several months to aware enough fissile material for just one bomb and still more time to build a deliverible nuclear weapon. secretary of decommon sense panetta recently estimated it would take two to three years to do so. the latest report bhaced on its ongoing inspections of iran's nuclear facilities, particularly the fordo and natan facilities find ir
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2012 1:00pm EST
with a democratic russia. we are exploring the wonders of new technology for the benefit of america and we are protecting our environment and we have reinvented the american government so it does more with less. it is a legacy unique in the history of this republic. i thank tepper for her friendship, for her crusade on behalf of our children and the mental health of the american people and always standing with us all along with her children and her family. i thank the members of our administration, the cabinet members, the members of the white house staff by. [applause] -- the members of the white house staff. i think all those part of the permanent service to the president, the white house and medical staff. be i think especially my secret service detail for serving a president determined not to be held apart from the american people. i thank the members of our campaign staff and all those who have served in this election and the work you have done. i think the leaders of our party in the congress and statehouses. i think all those who stood for what we believe in in these election
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17